IELTS TASK 1 WRITING: COMPARISON TASKS, BIG PICTURE

Here is another comparison question but in this case there are no huge differences between boys and girls so we look at a very simple way to group the data. This data also has an interesting addition:

1 The WORLD AVERAGE. When given information about averages or overall totals, candidates must be careful to take this information into account. These averages are almost always important.

2 It looks like there is more than one way to organise the data, but candidates must be very careful when this occurs to make sure you are targeted on the purpose of the data and don’t interpret the data in a way that hides its most significant feature.

This data compares the percentage of secondary age children in various regions who attended secondary school in 2005. (e.g. If a region has 100 secondary aged children but 45 of them work and 55 go to school, then 55% of secondary aged students go to school.)
School enrolment - secondary

DON”T MISS IMPORTANT INFORMATION IN THE BIG PICTURE
It might be tempting here to group this data by magnitude. It certainly looks like you could – what is high, what is in the middle, what is low.

The problem with this is that if you only group by magnitude, you lose a very significant aspect of the data and that is the regions in which the percentages of boys and girls attended secondary school AND when you think about it, this was the whole purpose of the data in the first place. So if a candidate did not raise this issue at all and just talked about the overall magnitudes of secondary school attendance, there is a very good chance they could face a problem that is raised in the PUBLIC BAND DESCRIPTORS at BAND 4 level under TASK ACHIEVEMENT:

• may confuse key features with detail

The only way to be sure that the key features have been covered here would be to present the important information about the differences in male and female enrolments AND in the process of giving the details for this comment on the different magnitudes in enrolments.

KEY FEATURES
PROPORTIONS OF MALES AND FEMALES ABOUT EQUAL
Industrialised countries
East Asia and Pacific

PROPORTIONS OF MALES HIGHER THAN FEMALES 
Middle East and North Africa
World average
West and Central Africa

PROPORTIONS OF FEMALES HIGHER THAN MALES 
Latin America and Caribbean

Notice that the World average is included in one of these groups and can also be used to compare which regions are above and below this average. This gives an important benchmark for how a region is doing compared to the rest of the world and this is why average figures like this can never be ignored.

THE BIG PICTURE
The big picture for this data might look like this:

“Overall, approximately equal percentages of boys and girls attended secondary school in the Industrialised countries, where all school aged children went to school, and East Asia and the Pacific while a higher proportion of girls than boys went to school in Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition, the data also shows that a higher percentage of boys than girls were enrolled in high school in the Middle East and North Africa, the World average and West and Central Africa, which had the lowest level of school enrolments of all regions by far and was the only region below the world average.”

This is a very complete overview and it is targeted on the key feature of the comparison between enrolments of boys and girls although it also raises some of the other notable features.

Anyone located in Bangkok, Thailand who requires help with IELTS preparation, call Jum on the hotline at 09 3962 2496, send her a message on Line using her Line ID: jummanie or contact her via email: warapron@ielts-english.info

(Data source: based on http://www.unicef.org/sowc07/docs/sowc07_table_5.xls )